HIST3907O ‘Digital History Research Methods’ or, Crafting Digital History

(I really need to work on my course titles.) Registration is open! Non-CU students can sign up until February 25th if they wish to obtain formal credit Update Jan 10: Class is underway! Join our Open Access Slack Community Space: http://slackinvite-hist3907oa.rhcloud.com/. Read the syllabus, explore the workbook at your own pace. Join me next winter, right now, online, to learn how to craft digital history. You can just follow along if you don’t want to pay tuition – all my materials will be openly available/copyable/remixable. If you need a university transfer credit, that (probably) can be arranged too. I especially welcome folks who … Continue reading HIST3907O ‘Digital History Research Methods’ or, Crafting Digital History

On Teaching High School

“Hey! Hey Sir!” Some words just cut right to the cerebellum. ‘Sir’ is not normally one of them, but I was at the Shawville Fair, and ‘sir’ isn’t often used in the midway. I turned, and saw before me a student from ten years previously. We chatted; he was married, had a step daughter, another one on the way. He’d apprenticed, become a mechanic. He was doing well. I was glad to see him. “So, you still teaching us assholes up at the school?” No, I was at the university. “You guys weren’t assholes.”. A Look. “Yes, we were. But … Continue reading On Teaching High School

Setting the groundwork for an undergraduate thesis project

We have a course code, HIST4910, for students doing their undergraduate thesis project. This project can take the form of an essay, it can be a digital project, it could be code, it could be in the form of any of the manifold ways digital history/humanities research is communicated. Hollis Peirce will be working with me this year on his HIST4910, which for now is called ‘The Evolution of the Digitization of History: Making History Accessible’. Hollis has been to DHSI twice now, once to take courses on digitization, once to work on the history of the book. Hollis’ interest … Continue reading Setting the groundwork for an undergraduate thesis project

Assessing my upcoming seminar on the Illicit Antiquities trade, HIST4805b

So I’m putting together the syllabus for my illicit antiquities seminar. This is where I think I’m going with the course, which starts in less than a month (eep!). The first part is an attempt to revitalize my classroom blogging, and to formally tie it into the discussion within the classroom – that is, something done in advance of class in order to make the classroom discussion richer. In the second term, I want to make as much time as possible for students to pursue their own independent research, which I’m framing as an ‘unessay’ following the O’Donnell model. ~oOo~ … Continue reading Assessing my upcoming seminar on the Illicit Antiquities trade, HIST4805b

HIST4805b Looted Heritage: The Illicit Antiquities Trade

I’m teaching a fourth year seminar next year dealing with issues surrounding the illicit antiquities trade. This seminar will be in conjunction with a larger project spearheaded by the investigative reporter and author Jason Felch, of Chasing Aphrodite. I’m quite excited about this; as an undergraduate, I once had the opportunity to work on a term project that looked at the antiquities market. That was twenty years ago; I’ve never really had the opportunity to scratch that itch since. So, when I was asked to suggest a seminar topic, I jumped at the chance to plumb the depths of my … Continue reading HIST4805b Looted Heritage: The Illicit Antiquities Trade

Some Assembly Required: teaching through/with/about/by/because of, the Digital Humanities (slides & notes)

I’m giving a keynote address to the Canadian Network for Innovation in Education conference, at Carleton on Thursday (10.30, River Building). I’ve never done a keynote before, so I’ll confess to being a bit nervous. ‘Provoke!’ I’ve been told. ‘Inspire! Challenge!’ Well, here goes…. These are the slides and the more-or-less complete speaker’s notes. I often write things out, and then completely adlib on the day, but this is more or less the flavour I’m going for. Some Assembly Required: Teaching through/with/about/by/because of, the Digital Humanities from DoctorG [Title] I never appreciated how scary those three words were until I … Continue reading Some Assembly Required: teaching through/with/about/by/because of, the Digital Humanities (slides & notes)

Some Assembly Required: Teaching through/with/about/by/because of, the Digital Humanities

I’m to speak at the  Canadian Network for Innovation in Education conference at Carleton in May; I’m one of the keynotes. I’ve never done a keynote before… I have a great fear of bringing coals to Newcastle, as it were. Pressed for a title and an abstract, this is what I’ve come up with (for good or ill): Some Assembly Required Every day, another university signs up to participate in Udacity, Coursera, or another of the monster MOOCs.  Every day, another job posting makes ‘digital humanities’ a requirement. These two trends are not unrelated. Canadians have been at the forefront … Continue reading Some Assembly Required: Teaching through/with/about/by/because of, the Digital Humanities