Zotero Maps: Visualizing Archaeology?

You can now map your Zotero Library: Potential Use Cases: Map Your Collection By Key Places: Many records from library catalogs and journal databases come pre-loaded with geographic keywords. Zotero Maps lets you quickly see the relationships between the terms catalogers, authors, and publishers have assigned to the items in your collection. Similarly, as you apply your own geographic tags to items you can then explore those geographic relationships. Whether you’re looking at key locations in studies of avian flu, ethnographic work in the American southwest, or the history of the transatlantic slave trade, the tags associated with your items … Continue reading Zotero Maps: Visualizing Archaeology?

World War II, Google Earth, and the South Etruria Survey

The British School at Rome’s celebrated ‘South Etruria Survey’, conducted by the School in the 1950s to the 1970s was partly in response to the rebuilding of Italy in the wake of World War II. As a research assistant on the BSR’s Tiber Valley Project in the late 1990s, I was helping to re-evaluate the SES. We would examine the original files & maps, unpack the original finds crates, and enter all of it into a GIS. The results from the restudy are still coming out. How I wish we’d had something like Google Earth! Google has just added imagery … Continue reading World War II, Google Earth, and the South Etruria Survey

Digital Humanities Summer Institute at U Vic 2010

The offerings at the Digital Humanities Summer Institute at the University of Victoria (BC) are quite interesting this year – though I note nothing on Agent Modelling.  If I was in that neck of the woods, I’d be quite keen to take the following – Geographical Information Systems in the Digital Humanities Ian GregoryThe course offers an introduction to the theory and practice of using Geographical Information Systems (GIS) to research the past. It will be primarily based on using the ArcGIS software package, the use of Google Earth to disseminate humanities data will also be explored. The course will … Continue reading Digital Humanities Summer Institute at U Vic 2010

Dynamic Modeling in a GIS Environment Autumn 2009

Courtesy of Andrew Crooks GIS and Agent Modelling blog , I learn today of a series of seminars exploring the latest in GIS & dynamic modelling, at the Global GIS Academy Of particular interest (to me, at any rate) are the following: October 28th Ling Bian (Buffalo) A dynamic social network model for disease transmission The work in this presentation was sponsored by a health care agency and some of the results reported remain confidential until we have permission from that agency to make the presentation available. See also: Bian, L. (2003) The representation of the environment in the context … Continue reading Dynamic Modeling in a GIS Environment Autumn 2009

Seminars on GIS & Archaeology

seen over at Stoa.org Contemporary Roles for Spatial Analysis in Archaeology The UCL Institute of Archaeology Seminar Series (January–March 2010) 31-34 Gordon Square, London WC1H 0PY Mondays 4pm, Room 612 (followed by a wine reception) Timetable 11 January 2010 – Benjamin Ducke (Oxford Archaeology) ‘Science without software no longer. Archaeological data analysis and the Open Source paradigm’ 18 January 2010 – Chris Green (University of Leicester) ‘Temporal GIS and archaeology’ 25 January 2010 – Tony Wilkinson (Durham University) ‘From household to region: incorporating agency into the interpretation of regional settlement’ 1 February 2010 – Tim Williams (University College London) ‘Earth … Continue reading Seminars on GIS & Archaeology

TravellerSim: Growing Settlement Structures and Territories with Agent-Based Modeling: full text

Below follows the full text of my and James’ TravellerSim article. Why leave it to sit on a shelf somewhere, when a random google search might find it, and find it useful? 2008 (with J. Steiner)  “Travellersim: Growing Settlement Structures and Territories with Agent-Based Modelling” in Jeffrey T. Clark and Emily M. Hagemeister (eds) Digital Discovery: Exploring New Frontiers in Human Heritage. CAA 2006. Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology. Proceedings of the 34th Conference, Fargo, United States, April 2006. Budapest: Archaeolingua. ~~~~~~~~~~ TravellerSim: Growing Settlement Structures and Territories with Agent-Based Modeling Shawn Graham1 , James Steiner2 1Department of … Continue reading TravellerSim: Growing Settlement Structures and Territories with Agent-Based Modeling: full text

Historical Maps, GIS, and Second Life

I’ve just come across a presentation (in three parts) given by David Rumsey, over a year ago. Worth a view! “A talk given by David Rumsey at the March 6, 2008 launch of his historical map library and exhibition in the virtual world of Second Life. The talk was delivered at the Rumsey Map Islands in Second Life. All of the maps in the talk can also be seen and downloaded from Rumsey’s free online map library at http://www.davidrumsey.com” Part I Part II Part III Continue reading Historical Maps, GIS, and Second Life

10th VAST International Symposium on Virtual Reality, Archeology and Cultural Heritage

First call for papers: 10th VAST International Symposium on Virtual Reality, Archeology and Cultural Heritage 7th Eurographics Workshop on Graphics and Cultural Heritage (VAST’09) September 22-25, 2009, Valletta, Malta http://www.vast2009.org ====================================================================================== ——————– Call for Papers ——————– -Towards a “digital agenda” for the integration of technologies into Archeology and Cultural Heritage- Nearly every organization whose mission includes promoting access to cultural information, is well aware of the value of digital applications, and digital technologies are finding their way into cultural organizations. Nevertheless, a clear-cut division still exists between humanities researchers, computer science researchers, information scientists, librarians, and campus technologists, which prevents … Continue reading 10th VAST International Symposium on Virtual Reality, Archeology and Cultural Heritage

Google Maps & Cultural Heritage

From Cameron Chapman at Mashable comes a list of the 100+ best tools and mashups; below are the ones I’ve selected that may be of interest to readers of this blog: Cassini – An overlay of 18th century maps over Google Maps that lets you adjust the transparency of either layer.  (I’ve got copies of the IGM maps of Central Italy from the early 20th century that were used by Ward-Perkins and the rest of the BSR team during the South Etruria survey – I’d love to get those done similar to this application, but I expect I’d run afoul … Continue reading Google Maps & Cultural Heritage