Virtual Worlds: and the most powerful graphics engine there is

Virtual worlds are not all about stunning immersive 3d graphics. No, to riff on the old Infocom advertisement, it’s your brain that matters most.  That’s right folks, the text adventure. Long time readers of this blog will know that I have experimented with this kind of immersive virtual world building for archaeological and historical purposes. But, with one thing and another, that all got put on a back shelf. Today, I discover via Jeremiah McCall’s Historical Simulations / Serious Games in the Classroom site Interactive Fiction (text adventure) games about Viking Sagas – part of Christopher Fee’s English 401 course … Continue reading Virtual Worlds: and the most powerful graphics engine there is

Second Life as an Archaeological Tool: Ruth Tringham

A podcast with Ruth Tringham on her work on Okapi Island: listen here ; transcript at http://www.ncptt.nps.gov/second-life-as-an-archaeological-tool/ Kevin Ammons: Welcome to the Preservation Technology podcast. I am Kevin Ammons. Today I am visiting with Ruth Tringham, one of the founders of the University of California Berkley the People in Multimedia Authoring Center for Teaching in Anthropology at Berkley (MACTiA). As a professor of anthropology at the University of California at Berkley Ruth uses an online virtual environment called Second Life in her teaching.Kevin Ammons: Welcome Ruth! How did you find yourself at Berkley exploring the notion of Second Life as … Continue reading Second Life as an Archaeological Tool: Ruth Tringham

New Talent Tuesdays: 3dHistory & Steve Donlin

I’m pleased to announce a new occasional series here on Electric Archaeology: “New Talent Tuesdays”. I have been getting queries from grad students, talented amateurs, avocational archaeologists and historians, about the possibility of contributing to this blog. At first, I was reluctant… but then I thought, why? And no good reason presented itself. So, if I can help someone else join the conversation then that certainly fits the mission of this blog, and academe more generally! If you are interested in contributing, send me a note with a brief background, links to your work, and your ideal topic. Without further … Continue reading New Talent Tuesdays: 3dHistory & Steve Donlin

Rebuilding Catalhoyuk

On my reading list: Colleen Morgan, Rebuilding Catalhoyuk (full text) Building virtual models of archaeological sites has been seen as a legitimate mode of representing the past, yet these models are too often the end product of a process in which archaeologists have relatively limited engagement. Instead of building static, isolated, uncanny, and authorless reconstructions, I argue for a more active role for archaeologists in virtual reconstruction and address issues of representational accuracy, personal expression in avatars and peopling the virtual past. Interactive virtual worlds such as Second Life provide tools and an environment that archaeologists can use to challenge … Continue reading Rebuilding Catalhoyuk

Digital Media and Learning Competition, HASTAC, archaeological entries

Some archaeological entries in this year’s competition: Virtual Heritage: Engaging and Exploring our Past in Second Life Posted by dmlcAdmin 2 days ago The heritage sites of the Mississippi Delta are important cultural monuments. This project brings three key Arkansas heritage sites into Second Life, allowing direct access to those sites for students and the general public. This virtual learning platform will be designed to allow a direct engagement with historic material. Read More | Discuss | Learning Labs | heritage reconstruction archaeology 3D virtual All National Geographic Treasures of the Earth Lab Posted by dmlcAdmin 2 days ago The … Continue reading Digital Media and Learning Competition, HASTAC, archaeological entries

The spatial analysis of past built environments: call for papers

from my inbox: CALL FOR PAPERS ———————————————— Dear All, We would like to let you know about an interdisciplinary and international workshop on spatial analysis of past built spaces that will take place in Berlin on the 1st and 2nd of April 2010 (please see details below). Our two-day workshop aims to promote discussion between a range of researchers in the disciplines of history/archaeology, urbanism, architecture, and computer science who have an interest in the spatial analysis of the built environment, and especially of historic and prehistoric spaces. A number of very interesting speakers will be participating, and we would … Continue reading The spatial analysis of past built environments: call for papers

Software Turns that Cheap Camera into a 3d Scanner

Now: can you think of some archaeological applications?🙂 See this post in Wired. It’s called ProFORMA, or Probabilistic Feature-based On-line Rapid Model Acquisition, but it is way cooler than it sounds. The software, written by a team headed by Qui Pan, a student at the Department of Engineering at Cambridge University in England, turns a regular, cheap webcam into a 3D scanner. Normally, scanning in 3D requires purpose-made gear and time. ProFORMA lets you rotate any object in front of the camera and it scans it in real time, building a fully 3D texture mapped model as fast as you … Continue reading Software Turns that Cheap Camera into a 3d Scanner

Masters and Doctoral Theses on Serious Games

A list maintained by Katrin Becker at SFU, ‘Serious Games Pathfinder‘: The following is a list of Master’s and Doctoral theses that have been completed that have to do with serious games (and in some cases more broadly with digital games). Doctoral Theses are marked in bold. You can get more info on each thesis by clicking on the associated ‘details’ link. Note: I am just starting to develop this list. So far, almost all the theses are Canadian ones. If anyone has a thesis they would like me to add, please let me know the following: Name, Title, Year, … Continue reading Masters and Doctoral Theses on Serious Games

Visualisation in Archaeology

An interesting project hosted by Southampton in the UK and English Heritage – see the full website here. They’re hosting what looks to be a fascinating wee conference in October: Visualisation In Context: An Interplay of Practice and Theory 22 – 23 October 2009 Hosted by the University of Southampton The 2009 VIA Workshop is designed to probe the intersections between theory (which might traditionally be represented in terms of critique – linear and written) and practice (which might increasingly be expressed in terms of production – non-linear and visual) within the field of archaeology as well as other disciplines … Continue reading Visualisation in Archaeology