Getting Data out of Open Context & Doing Useful Things With It: Coda

Previously, on tips to get stuff out of Open Context… In part 1, I showed you how to generate a list of URLs that you could then feed into `wget` to download information. In part 2, I showed you how to use `jq` and `jqplay` – via the amazing Matthew Lincoln, from whom I’ve learned whatever small things I know about the subject – to examine the data and to filter it for exactly what you want. Today – combining wget & jq Today, we use wget to pipe the material through jq to get the csv of your dreams. … Continue reading Getting Data out of Open Context & Doing Useful Things With It: Coda

Getting Data out of Open Context & Doing Useful Things With It: Part 2

If you recall, at the end of part 1 I said ‘oh, by the way, Open Context lets you download data as csv anyway’. You might have gotten frustrated with me there – Why are we bothering with the json then? The reason is that the full data is exposed via json, and who knows, there might be things in there that you find you need, or that catch your interest, or need to be explored further. (Note also, Open Context has unique URI’s – identifiers- for every piece of data they have; these unique URIs are captured in the … Continue reading Getting Data out of Open Context & Doing Useful Things With It: Part 2

Getting Data out of Open Context & Doing Useful Things With It: Part 1

a walkthrough for extracting and manipulating data from opencontext.org Search for something interesting. I put ‘poggio’ in the search box, and then clicked on the various options to get the architectural fragments. Look at the URL: https://opencontext.org/subjects-search/?prop=oc-gen-cat-object&q=Poggio#15/43.1526/11.4090/19/any/Google-Satellite See all that stuff after the word ‘Poggio’? That’s to generate the map view. We don’t need it. We’re going to ask for the search results w/o all of the website extras, no maps, no shiny interface. To do that, we take advantage of the API. With open context, if you have a search with a ‘?’ in the URL, you can put … Continue reading Getting Data out of Open Context & Doing Useful Things With It: Part 1

Open Notebooks Part V: Notational Velocity and 1 superRobot

The thought occurred that not everyone wants to take their notes in Scrivener. You might prefer the simple elegance and speed of Notational Velocity, for instance. Yet, when it comes time to integrate those notes, to interrogate those notes, to rearrange them to see what kind of coherent structure you might have, Scrivener is hard to beat. With Notational Velocity installed, go to ‘preferences’. Under ‘Notes’ change ‘Read notes from folder’ to point to the Scrivener synchronization folder. Then, change ‘store and read notes on disk as:’ to ‘rich text format files’. This will save every note as a separate … Continue reading Open Notebooks Part V: Notational Velocity and 1 superRobot