SAA 2015: Macroscopic approaches to archaeological histories: Insights into archaeological practice from digital methods

Ben Marwick and I are organizing a session for the SAA2015 (the 80th edition, this year in San Francisco) on “Macroscopic approaches to archaeological histories: Insights into archaeological practice from digital methods”. It’s a pretty big tent. Below is the session ID and the abstract. If this sounds like something you’d be interested in, why don’t you get in touch? Session ID 743. The history of archaeology, like most disciplines, is often presented as a sequence of influential individuals and a discussion of their greatest hits in the literature.  Two problems with this traditional approach are that it sidelines the … Continue reading SAA 2015: Macroscopic approaches to archaeological histories: Insights into archaeological practice from digital methods

A Tale of Two Conferences: CAA UK and SAA 2011, as experienced on Twitter

Two conferences at the same time, opposite sides of the world (give or take), and you can’t get to either? There’s an app for that, and it’s called Twitter. Nicolas Laracuente has been curating tweets relating to the Society for American Archaeology Annual Meeting in Sacramento via Storify – you can see his reporting on the conference here. Inspired by Nicolas’ work, Jessica Ogden performed the same service at the Computer Applications in Archaeology UK edition conference, here. Some of the things going on in the UK in terms of digital archaeology are very exciting indeed. What with my own … Continue reading A Tale of Two Conferences: CAA UK and SAA 2011, as experienced on Twitter

Simulating Patronage & Resource Extraction: An Agent Based Roman Economic Model

International conference Land and natural resources in the Roman World Brussels, 2011, Thu. 26th – Sat. 28th May My contribution bears the provisional title – ‘Simulating Patronage & Resource Extraction: an agent-based Roman economic model’ “Starting with the idea that the Roman economy was socially and politically embedded in networks of patronage, this paper explores the ramifications of that understanding for natural resource extraction, using an agent-based model. Agent models employ hundreds of autonomous, individual software agents, interacting in a digital environment, according to the rules we specify. In this case, the rules are drawn from our understanding of how patronage worked in Roman society. … Continue reading Simulating Patronage & Resource Extraction: An Agent Based Roman Economic Model

Still Mulling Playing with History

I was at the Playing with History unconference last week – my first unconference. Twitter’d comments findable at #pastplay What a neat way to spend a couple of days! I’m still mulling it over, my fever’d brain brimming with possibilities, avenues to explore…  For excellent summaries of what went on, see Rob MacDougall and Geoffrey Rockwell‘s separate evaluations of the day. My discussion pieces on The NetherNet and ‘Rolling your own‘ went over well (though I could’ve made things a whole lot clearer with the latter by reminding everyone that my experience there – my glorious failure, I calls it … Continue reading Still Mulling Playing with History

The Game’s the Thing

I’m headed of to the Niagara peninsula next month, for Playing With Technology in History. Here’s what I thought I’d talk about : Shawn Graham, “Rolling your own: On Modding Commercial Games for Educational Goals” Making modifications to existing commercial games is a strong and vibrant sub-culture in modern video gaming. Many publishers now provide tools to make this easier, as part of their marketing strategy. In this paper, I look at the nature and quality of the discussions that occur on the fan mod sites as a form of participatory history. I also reflect on some of my own … Continue reading The Game’s the Thing

The spatial analysis of past built environments: call for papers

from my inbox: CALL FOR PAPERS ———————————————— Dear All, We would like to let you know about an interdisciplinary and international workshop on spatial analysis of past built spaces that will take place in Berlin on the 1st and 2nd of April 2010 (please see details below). Our two-day workshop aims to promote discussion between a range of researchers in the disciplines of history/archaeology, urbanism, architecture, and computer science who have an interest in the spatial analysis of the built environment, and especially of historic and prehistoric spaces. A number of very interesting speakers will be participating, and we would … Continue reading The spatial analysis of past built environments: call for papers

Call for Papers: Complex Networks

Arts | Humanities | Complex Networks – a Leonardo satellite symposium at NetSci 2010 is taking place at BarabásiLab – Center for Complex Network Research, Northeastern University in Boston, MA, on Monday, May 10, 2010. Abstract: By means of keynotes, contributed talks and interdisciplinary discussion we will explore and identify important issues surrounding the convergence of arts, humanities and complex networks. On the one hand we will concentrate on network structure and dynamics in areas ranging from art history and archeology to music, film and image science. In the same time we are interested in the development and critique of … Continue reading Call for Papers: Complex Networks

Conference Call for Papers: NORTH AMERICAN ASSOCIATION FOR COMPUTATIONAL SOCIAL AND ORGANIZATIONAL SCIENCES

NAACSOS – NORTH AMERICAN ASSOCIATION FOR COMPUTATIONAL SOCIAL AND ORGANIZATIONAL SCIENCES 2009 NAACSOS Annual Conference October 23-24, 2009 http://www.asu.edu/clas/csdc/events/naacsos.html http://www.casos.cs.cmu.edu/naacsos/ CALL FOR PAPERS This year our NAACSOS Annual Conference will he held on 23-24 October in Tempe, Arizona. It will be hosted by The Center of Social Dynamics and Complexity at Arizona State University. Center for Social Dynamics and Complexity Tempe, AZ 85287-4804 http://www.asu.edu/clas/csdc/ Over the past decade simulating social processes has achieved some level of credibility — and yet progress in this area is stifled because of the lack of agreement on several critical core features. The objective of … Continue reading Conference Call for Papers: NORTH AMERICAN ASSOCIATION FOR COMPUTATIONAL SOCIAL AND ORGANIZATIONAL SCIENCES

Conference: Trade, Commerce, and the State in the Roman World, 1-3 Oct 2009

As I don’t expect I’ll be in Oxford any time soon😦 , maybe somebody could take notes on William Harris’ presentation on the timber trade in the Roman world? Many thanks! I’ve been interested in that trade for a while – it is woefully underexplored – and I have some thoughts on it coming out in the Cambridge Companion to the City of Rome (due out soon, I believe!), but these are mostly cursory. I’m imagining someone like Harris probably has some very interesting things to say… Conference: Trade, Commerce, and the State in the Roman World Oxford Conference on … Continue reading Conference: Trade, Commerce, and the State in the Roman World, 1-3 Oct 2009