Working out the kinks in a VisualSFM via Docker workflow

VSFM, for those who’ve tried it, is a right huge pain in the arse to install. Ryan Bauman has done us all a huge favour by dockerizing it. His explanation of this is here – and once you’ve figured out some of the kinks, this is much easier way of working with it. Ah yes, the kinks. First of all, before we go any further, why would you want to do this? Isn’t 123D Catch enough? It is certainly easier, I grant you that. And it does a pretty good job. But structure-from-motion applications each approach the job differently – Ryan … Continue reading Working out the kinks in a VisualSFM via Docker workflow

historical maps into Unity3d

This should work. Say there’s a historical map that you want to digitize.  It may or may not have contour lines on it, but there is some indication of the topography (hatching or shading or what not). Say you wanted to digitize it such that a person could explore its conception of geography from a first person perspective. Here’s a workflow for making that happen. Some time ago, the folks at the NYPL put together a tutorial explaining how to turn such a map into a minecraft world. So let’s do the first part of their tutorial. In essence, what we … Continue reading historical maps into Unity3d for hosting your 3d scans

I’m playing with to host some three dimensional models I’ve been making with 123D Catch. These are models that I have been using in conjunction with Junaio to create augmented reality pop-up books (and other things; more on that anon). Putting these 3d objects onto a webpage (or heaven forbid, a pdf) has been strangely much more complicated and time-consuming. then serves a very useful purpose then! Below are two models that I made using 123D catch. The first is the end of a log recovered from anaerobic conditions at the bottom of the Ottawa River (which is … Continue reading for hosting your 3d scans

Mesoamerica in Gatineau: Augmented Reality Museum Catalogue Pop-Up Book

Would you like to take a look at the term project of my first year seminar course in digital antiquity at Carleton University? Now’s your chance! Last winter, Terence Clark and Matt Betts, curators at the Museum of Civilization in Gatineau Quebec, saw on this blog that we were experimenting with 123D Catch (then called ‘Photofly’) to make volumetric models of objects from digital photographs. Terence and Matt were also experimenting with the same software. They invited us to the museum to select objects from the collection. The students were enchanted with materials from mesoamerica, and our term project was … Continue reading Mesoamerica in Gatineau: Augmented Reality Museum Catalogue Pop-Up Book

Virtual Worlds: and the most powerful graphics engine there is

Virtual worlds are not all about stunning immersive 3d graphics. No, to riff on the old Infocom advertisement, it’s your brain that matters most.  That’s right folks, the text adventure. Long time readers of this blog will know that I have experimented with this kind of immersive virtual world building for archaeological and historical purposes. But, with one thing and another, that all got put on a back shelf. Today, I discover via Jeremiah McCall’s Historical Simulations / Serious Games in the Classroom site Interactive Fiction (text adventure) games about Viking Sagas – part of Christopher Fee’s English 401 course … Continue reading Virtual Worlds: and the most powerful graphics engine there is

New Talent Tuesdays: 3dHistory & Steve Donlin

I’m pleased to announce a new occasional series here on Electric Archaeology: “New Talent Tuesdays”. I have been getting queries from grad students, talented amateurs, avocational archaeologists and historians, about the possibility of contributing to this blog. At first, I was reluctant… but then I thought, why? And no good reason presented itself. So, if I can help someone else join the conversation then that certainly fits the mission of this blog, and academe more generally! If you are interested in contributing, send me a note with a brief background, links to your work, and your ideal topic. Without further … Continue reading New Talent Tuesdays: 3dHistory & Steve Donlin