Still haven’t found what I’m looking for – but this might be closest

Ok. Maybe this is a good idea. Problem: You want your students to keep track of their research in an open notebook. You don’t want to faff with jekyll and anything too complicated. You don’t know what kinds of machines your students will have, so it’s got to be cross-platform. Perhaps a solution: Student creates a new folder on their machine called ‘open notebook’. Student downloads MDWiki (download link) Student unzips the mdwiki.html file into their ‘open notebook’ folder. Student renames mdwiki.html to index.html Student creates an ‘index.md’ file with whatever info they want displayed on the main page – … Continue reading Still haven’t found what I’m looking for – but this might be closest

Getting Data out of Open Context & Doing Useful Things With It: Coda

Previously, on tips to get stuff out of Open Context… In part 1, I showed you how to generate a list of URLs that you could then feed into `wget` to download information. In part 2, I showed you how to use `jq` and `jqplay` – via the amazing Matthew Lincoln, from whom I’ve learned whatever small things I know about the subject – to examine the data and to filter it for exactly what you want. Today – combining wget & jq Today, we use wget to pipe the material through jq to get the csv of your dreams. … Continue reading Getting Data out of Open Context & Doing Useful Things With It: Coda

Getting Data out of Open Context & Doing Useful Things With It: Part 2

If you recall, at the end of part 1 I said ‘oh, by the way, Open Context lets you download data as csv anyway’. You might have gotten frustrated with me there – Why are we bothering with the json then? The reason is that the full data is exposed via json, and who knows, there might be things in there that you find you need, or that catch your interest, or need to be explored further. (Note also, Open Context has unique URI’s – identifiers- for every piece of data they have; these unique URIs are captured in the … Continue reading Getting Data out of Open Context & Doing Useful Things With It: Part 2

Getting Data out of Open Context & Doing Useful Things With It: Part 1

a walkthrough for extracting and manipulating data from opencontext.org Search for something interesting. I put ‘poggio’ in the search box, and then clicked on the various options to get the architectural fragments. Look at the URL: https://opencontext.org/subjects-search/?prop=oc-gen-cat-object&q=Poggio#15/43.1526/11.4090/19/any/Google-Satellite See all that stuff after the word ‘Poggio’? That’s to generate the map view. We don’t need it. We’re going to ask for the search results w/o all of the website extras, no maps, no shiny interface. To do that, we take advantage of the API. With open context, if you have a search with a ‘?’ in the URL, you can put … Continue reading Getting Data out of Open Context & Doing Useful Things With It: Part 1

A Tiny Excavation

Sometimes, the story emerges in the gaps… ‘TinyArchaeology‘ is a twitter bot that tweets out episodic glimpses inside a particularly dysfunctional excavation (using both emojis and text). It was built with CheapBotsDoneQuick which uses the generative grammar ‘Tracery‘. Give it a shot. You can use the TinyArchaeology source code to get started. Continue reading A Tiny Excavation

I love the people

I came across this corpus of Trump speeches today. So naturally, I fed it into Karpathy’s RNN. Can a computer write an article? Probably no, not yet. But it certainly can do a Trump speech. Behold: MACPA406-SG:rnn shawngraham$ th sample.lua cv/lm_lstm_epoch18.09_0.9175.t7 -temperature 0.5 -primetext “I’m Donald Trump” I’m Donald Trump. I don’t want to do it. I want to thank you. I have a very sad the guy with the last time his one of the great respect for the Second Amendment. And they were supposed to be because they were saying that we have to do it. And by the … Continue reading I love the people