Towards the computational study of the Roman economy: draft

I’m contributing to a volume on  ‘Land and Natural Resources in the Roman World’. Below is my draft, on which I welcome comments and questions. Towards the computational study of the Roman economy Shawn Graham, Carleton University, Ottawa Canada “Economies are complicated systems encompassing micro behaviours, interaction patterns, and global regularities. Whether partial or general in scope, studies of economic systems must consider how to handle difficult real-world aspects such as asymmetric information, imperfect competition, strategic interaction, collective learning, and the possibility of multiple equilibria. Recent advances in analytical and computational tools are permitting new approaches to the quantitative study … Continue reading Towards the computational study of the Roman economy: draft

How I Lost the Crowd: A Tale of Sorrow and Hope

Yesterday, my HeritageCrowd project website was annihilated. Gone. Kaput. Destroyed. Joined the choir. It is a dead parrot. This is what I think happened, what I now know and need to learn, and what I think the wider digital humanities community needs to think about/teach each other. HeritageCrowd was (may be again, if I can salvage from the wreckage) a project that tried to encourage the crowdsourcing of local cultural heritage knowledge for a community that does not have particularly good internet access or penetration. It was built on the Ushahidi platform, which allows folks to participate via cell phone … Continue reading How I Lost the Crowd: A Tale of Sorrow and Hope

Briefly Noted: Lytro, Light-Field Photography

  In the latest MIT Technology Review, there’s a short piece on the ‘Lytro‘, a camera that captures not just the light that falls on its sensor, but also the angle of that light. This feature allows different information, different kinds of shots, to be extracted computationally after the button is pressed. I want one. They sell for $500. Think of the archaeological uses! I’m no photographer, but as I understand things, a lot of archaeological photography comes down to the creative use of oblique angles, whether to see crop marks or to pick out very fine details of artefacts. … Continue reading Briefly Noted: Lytro, Light-Field Photography

Mesoamerica in Gatineau: Augmented Reality Museum Catalogue Pop-Up Book

Would you like to take a look at the term project of my first year seminar course in digital antiquity at Carleton University? Now’s your chance! Last winter, Terence Clark and Matt Betts, curators at the Museum of Civilization in Gatineau Quebec, saw on this blog that we were experimenting with 123D Catch (then called ‘Photofly’) to make volumetric models of objects from digital photographs. Terence and Matt were also experimenting with the same software. They invited us to the museum to select objects from the collection. The students were enchanted with materials from mesoamerica, and our term project was … Continue reading Mesoamerica in Gatineau: Augmented Reality Museum Catalogue Pop-Up Book