MadLat Conference, Winnipeg

Just got back, will post more when I have a moment – keynote speaker was excellent, and his session on ‘Instructional Robotics’ was fantastic, though poorly attended. I expect people were put off by the title… but imagine a remotely operated vehicle, armed with camera, directional microphone, and wee video screen roaming the aisles of a distance-ed classroom, and you get the picture…

My presentation was well attended, which made a nice change from the Classics conferences I’ve gone to and given an online learning or games-related paper. Typically, the classicists are just not interested – there’ll be me, the moderator, the other two presenters, and the guy who thought that this was a session on Attic pottery….

Anyway, one nice comment at the end of my paper was along the lines of, ‘it’s very interesting to see someone actually implementing games or Second Life, and not just talking about the theoretical side of things!’ In truth, I’m not that far removed from the theoretical side, though I have subjected students to some of my experiments.

Right. Presentation is here, designed and implemented courtesy of Flypaper, whom I thanked in my talk. It might not live at that location for too long, in which case I’ll post it somewhere else, if necessary.

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2 thoughts on “MadLat Conference, Winnipeg

  1. Shawn, do you have any links for the ‘Instructional Robotics’ presentation? I bring this up from time to time as an emerging technology with the potential to disrupt, but people’s eyes often glaze over. Real world examples are always helpful. Cheers, Scott

  2. Um, no, but I do have a copy of the handout by Sugata Mitra, who was the keynote – didn’t mention his name in the original post, cause I couldn’t find the handout and I didn’t want to misspell it. I’m hoping to write a reflection on some of his stuff later this week (ideally), so I’m glad I found his handouts!

    Anyway, he’s at Newcastle University at the moment; there might be something there on Instructional Robotics. A paper by him on the ‘Hole in the Wall’ computers is at http://www.ascilite.org.au/ajet/ajet21/mitra.html

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